Can Border Agents Search Your Phone Without a Warrant?

In Riley v. California (2014), the U.S. Supreme Court held that law enforcement officials had violated the Fourth Amendment when they searched an arrestee’s cellphone without a warrant. “Modern cell phones are not just another technological convenience,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority. “With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans ‘the privacies of life.’ The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought.” The requirement to get a warrant may not apply, however, when an American citizen is returning home from abroad and U.S. border officials want to search the contents of that person’s phone—at least according to a decision issued in March by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit.

Source: Can Border Agents Search Your Phone Without a Warrant?

Warrantless border searches of electronics may be illegal, court rules

A Massachusetts federal court declined Thursday to throw out a suit challenging the U.S. government’s practice of conducting warrantless digital device searches at borders and airports. The Trump administration had tried to have the lawsuit dismissed, but Judge Denise Casper determined that the suit had “plausibly alleged” that such searches violated constitutional protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.

Source: Warrantless border searches of electronics may be illegal, court rules

No Fourth Amendment Protections Against Warrantless Cell Phone Searches at U.S. Border, Says Federal Court

In its 2014 decision in Riley v. California , the U.S. Supreme Court held that law enforcement officials violated the Fourth Amendment when they searched an arrestee’s cell phone without a warrant. “Modern cell phones are not just another technological convenience,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority. “With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans ‘the privacies of life.’ The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought.” But what about when an American citizen is returning home from abroad and U.S. border officials want to thoroughly search the contents of that person’s cell phone?

Source: No Fourth Amendment Protections Against Warrantless Cell Phone Searches at U.S. Border, Says Federal Court

Feds Searching Record Number of Our Personal Devices at the Border

While doing research for my novel Kill Big Brother I had off-the-record conversations with men and women from U.S. intelligence agencies. I also interviewed Dark Web types who insisted they stay on background. None of these individuals told me about secret government programs or anything at all that would make an interesting scene in a Jason Bourne movie.

Source: Feds Searching Record Number of Our Personal Devices at the Border

Canadian woman banned from US for life after border agent searches phone, finds email to doctor about drug use

A 28-year-old woman from British Columbia was banned for life from entering the United States after a US Customs and Border Protection agent searched her phone for two hours and found an email she’d written to her doctor about an accidental drug overdose.

Source: Canadian woman banned from US for life after border agent searches phone, finds email to doctor about drug use