US Air Force proposal: pause the Earth’s rotation so nukes would miss targets

In 1960, the US Air Force asked the RAND Corporation to evaluate the possibility of using stationary rockets to pause the Earth’s rotation in the event of a nuclear attack. Called “Project Retro,” the idea was that the “a huge rectangular array of one thousand first-stage Atlas engines… (would) be fastened securely to the earth in a horizontal position.” As missiles approached, the rockets would fire, stopping the Earth’s rotation just enough for the nukes to overshoot their targets.

Source: US Air Force proposal: pause the Earth’s rotation so nukes would miss targets

Moon discovery may expand where we search for alien life

Every discovery we make about the universe has implications for us. Understanding how our solar system formed, and how we got here, helps us figure out how likely it is that we’ll find life on other planets. Even just our corner of the galaxy is vast; anything we can do to help narrow the possibilities of where we can and should search for life beyond our planet is helpful.

Source: Moon discovery may expand where we search for alien life

A brief history of quantum alternatives

Enlarge (credit: Central Press/Getty Images) In 1915, Albert Einstein, with a ee pittle help from his friends, developed a theory of gravity that overturned what we’d thought were the very foundations of physical reality. The idea that the space that we inhabit was not perfectly described by Euclidean geometry had been inconceivable—so much so that the philosopher Immanuel Kant, a radical thinker in so many ways, proclaimed that it was not possible for any theory of physics to dispense with it.

Source: A brief history of quantum alternatives